What Meaningful Reflection On Student Work Can Do for Learning | MindShift | KQED News

This is an excellent article that shows the importance of reflection in learning. There are so many ideas for educators to use in their practices. While not all of these were named, these are my thoughts after reading the article.
  • providing meaningful feedback to their students;
  • discussing the big picture with students;
  • providing time for students to reflect regularly and building these habits;
  • creating a culture of sharing reflections with community members; and
  • how student led conferences can be valuable. 
  • tags: metacognition learning reflection Student Led Conferences

    • For student reflection to be meaningful, it must be metacognitive, applicable, and shared with others.

    • If students are metacognitive about inquiry, then they’re thinking about exactly how they are going to phrase that question;

    • if they’re metacognitive about collaboration, then they’re considering how their introvert or extrovert personality will affect the group.

    • Metacognition is essentially reflection on the micro level, an awareness of our own thought processes as we complete them.

    • Metacognitive reflection, however, takes this process to the next level because it is concerned not with assessment, but with self-improvement:

    • metacognitive reflection can be used to develop resilience in the face of a challenge.

    • Many young children (and some adults) will throw down their work when they become frustrated with it, unable to transcend the struggle. By contrast, a student who has learned the value of metacognitive reflection will recognize frustration as a signal to pause and think through the situation instead of plowing ahead with the same approach or giving up entirely.

    • How is this reflection going to help me in the future? I

    • Keeping a log of tasks and habits, for example, gives students a rich source of data to mine when reflecting on their progress, and there are many apps that will collect and aggregate this information in accessible and attractive ways.

    • Even using a simple timer can help students chunk out their work so they take a reflective break, and some programs have breaks built into the timer cycle, so that a pause from the work is guaranteed.

    • This kind of isolated, after-the-fact reflection dominates our understanding of the process. When asked to imagine a person reflecting, you probably conjure up an image of an individual alone, in a comfortable place, staring off into the distance, plaintively contemplating some earlier life event. This scene is likely set at the end of a calendar year, or at the end of a lifetime—or, if you imagined a professional setting, at a retirement party.

    • Unfortunately, this sentimental notion of reflection for reflection’s sake keeps the practice from being used for active improvement in the here and now.

    • By being transparent about future tasks and assignments, teachers remind students that they’re going to have to use at least some of these skills again, so there’s no sense in making the same mistakes.

    • Reflection suddenly has a real and immediate purpose: You know where this course is going, so how are you going to improve the quality of your own journey?

    • Proximity here is key; reviewing a previous reflection can be most instructive when students are working on the next task, so their reflection should be stored wherever that work is happening.

    • Digital tools also provide different mediums for students to capture their thoughts—they can type or tag, or talk into the microphone or camera.

    • Electronic tools of analysis can also play a big role here. Just as athletes track their physical performance using a specific set of metrics, students may benefit from reviewing their academic achievements in different areas, like the categories of a rubric or a list of discrete skills.

    • In the interest of keeping up appearances, we don’t really like to share our weaknesses and past failures (although we do love gawking at the problems and misfortunes of others).

    • But if we are really seeking to take action based on our reflections, then we will likely need some help, and that means we have to own up about what needs work. To make students comfortable with this practice, the classroom has to become a place where each student is recognized as being on an individual path of improvement—and, an important point, no student has reached the end of the path, because there is no end.

    • By sharing their reflections on their academic work, students can both advise and seek help from their peers.

    • Just as electronic tools make reflections easy to access for an individual, so, too, do they make it easy to share. Sharing becomes instantaneous when material is available online; the collection of commentary from an entire class can also be indexed, searched, and organized by theme—a feature that may be of great use for the teacher, who will want to look at both individual goals and the class’s experience as a whole.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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